Where are the economic historians?

Read Eric Rauchway’s excellent post.  Excerpt:

Economic history might have moved out of history departments for market reasons as well.  If, to pursue economic history, you had to master technical skills that would make you eligible for an appointment in an economics department, you would probably prefer that to an appointment in a history department: economists get paid more because they’re eligible for employment in government and business as well as universities.

Some of the economic historians are coming to George Mason; this year we hired John Nye, Werner Troesken, and Gary Richardson.  New hire Peter Leeson does some economic history as well.  We’ve gone from a minor player in the field to a top department for economic history.

But will they be fun at lunch?

Comments

At least Nye will be, Robin Hanson-like figure that he is and
refugee from the Wash U blowout.

I applaud the GMU econ dept. for moving in this direction.

Very interesting. Could you comment on a related issue? It was my understanding several years ago that economic history was a fairly marginal field within economics; I recall complaints that many economics grad. students felt no need to learn economic history, and that many prominent departments had one or no economic historians. Is that still the case, or has economic history bounced back?

I took a summer course with GMU-er Thomas Rustici back in 2003 and he spent a lot of time on economic history. At the start of the course (Econ. and Public Policy for journalists), he promised that by the end of course we wouldn't view the world the same way. We all rolled our eyes. At the end of the summer I didn't see the world in the same way so much that I changed my minor to economics.

Hmm. I guess I needed my afternoon coffee. :-) Rauchway lists him both ways

@ v: "Could you comment on a related issue? It was my understanding several years ago that economic history was a fairly marginal field within economics; I recall complaints that many economics grad. students felt no need to learn economic history, and that many prominent departments had one or no economic historians. Is that still the case, or has economic history bounced back?"

I thought so, too.

BTW: There's no post ID attached to the hyperlink [Read Eric Rauchway's excellent post]. In case anyone's confused, the link for the actual post is: http://www.tnr.com/blog/openuniversity?pid=93423

Otherwise, the link just takes you to the blog's main index: http://www.tnr.com/blog/openuniversity

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