From the comments

Mesa wrote:

I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate.

I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate. – See more at: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/05/gini-coefficient-for-u-s-universities.html#comments

I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate. – See more at: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/05/gini-coefficient-for-u-s-universities.html#comments
I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate. – See more at: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/05/gini-coefficient-for-u-s-universities.html#comments

I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate. – See more at: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/05/gini-coefficient-for-u-s-universities.html#comments
I would suspect that successful research institutions don’t feel obliged to redistribute their funding to less fortunate institutions. I think the point that is interesting here is that successful academic institutions are probably deemed to have earned their support, while successful business people are not, they having generally thought to have earned their success through luck or inheritance. From the endowment and research funding data it seems universities have both high income inequality and wealth inequality, to use terminology from the current debate. – See more at: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/05/gini-coefficient-for-u-s-universities.html#comments

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