Chinese chieftain of the day

In a bid to enhance interaction and business with the Chinese in Kano State, the Emir of Kano, Emir Muhammadu Sanusi II has approved the appointment and instalment of a Chinese man, Mr Mike Zhang, as a chief and leader of the growing Chinese community in the northern Nigerian state.

Mr Mike Zhang, a Chinese trader in Kano will be referred to as “Wakilin Yan China” after his turbaning on April 25 at the Emir’s palace in Kano. He will be responsible for the proper management of the Chinese community and he would act as their representative in the Kano royalty in times of need.

There are photos at the link, via Tammy.

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If you are as ignorant as me, you might appreciate to know WTF is Kano: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kano_State

I think they play in the Missouri Valley Conference.

Ha.

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Thanks. So it's not the Mortal Kombat character!

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The truth about Red China has been revealed. Read the article Wall Street and the Democrats don't want you to read: https://nationalinterest.org/feature/why-america-must-maintain-ideological-dominance-52082

Such is life in Emir Muhammadu Sanusi II's Kano State.

More like life in General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China Xi's Kano State.

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Yup, nothing comparable to the magnificent and ever advancing life in Brazil under President Captain Bolsonaro, of course

Exactly.

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The Emir of Kano is a very interesting character leading 25 million people in Northern Nigeria. Here's an FT lunch interview: https://www.ft.com/content/3abb1912-261a-11e8-b27e-cc62a39d57a0

From the article linked by Tamara Winter:

"The rise in Chinese traders has caused several conflicts between the Chinese and Kano traders and this is a problem the Emir wants to solve to prevent a more complicated situation in the near future."

The Chinese guy got into a very bad position. In the eyes of the Emir, he has to rule over Chinese merchants. In the eyes of Chinese merchants, he has no authority. When a conflict arises and the Emir tells him to solve it, what will he do?

PS: the FT wrote "Lamido Samusi II".

My mistake, it's Lamido Sanusi II with an N in the lastname.

He was the governor of the central bank of Nigeria and leaked to the press a story of missing 20 billion USD from oil sales. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/world/africa/governor-of-nigerias-central-bank-is-fired-after-warning-of-missing-oil-revenue.html

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"The Chinese guy got into a very bad position. In the eyes of the Emir, he has to rule over Chinese merchants. In the eyes of Chinese merchants, he has no authority. When a conflict arises and the Emir tells him to solve it, what will he do? "

This is sort of how the 1st Opium War got started.

Let us be blunt: Red China seeks a casus belli. It wants world domination.

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Here is the story on how China is retooling Belt and Road: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/25/business/china-belt-and-road-infrastructure.html

What is a poetic device? It is subjective bias. In-fact, into can be considered a similie. In both cases, there is a sense that Grammar has been “thrown under,” linearly, to fashion a deeper meaning. Arthur Kinney’s ". . . [it] is an early stage of cognizance—what Augustine calls the "divine imprint" on the soul that is a kind of homing instinct, a sense of vocation whether accepted or not.” How to accommodate a broader input with constant (?) change while optimizing the syntax.

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It is not unusual for an expat living in Nigeria for a long time and considered to contribute to the welfare of the local community there, to be named a Honorary chief. One of my colleagues in the expat Group I worked for in Lagos was a honorary chief; he had lived there over two decades.

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Is there meant to be an implication that China had a role in this person's appointment?

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Chinese have been visiting Africa (by boat) at least since the first half of the fifteenth century CE: where are our leading tomes comparing European colonial efforts of that era (and up to contemporary days) with "Chinese colonial efforts" (a locution I hardly ever see in pop journalism accounts of Chinese political economy) across Africa?

How might European and Chinese colonial efforts compare with the history of Arab/Muslim political economy across the continent?

(By the by: when did Europeans become aware that the Chinese visited East Africa at least a full half-century before their own ships arrived?)

Red China controls American public discourse. Its Confucious Institutes retain a firm grip on American universities and Chinese interests control Hollywood and the mainatream media. Let us be blunt: we are dealing with what famous American president Ronald Reagan called "the most dangerous enemy that has ever faced mankind in his long climb from the swamp to the stars": communist totalitarianism.

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Americans have been walking on the Moon (by spaceship) at least since the seventh decade of the twentieth century CE. They have colonized the Moon about as effectively as Imperial China colonized Africa.

Oops, that was a reply to Edward Burke.

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This side of the Transatlantic slave trade and the Congo Free State, Chinese colonial efforts in Africa may well have barely begun in earnest. Stay tuned.

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History has some very strange parallels - I think the newly industrializing African states may want to brush up on the first round of chinese migrant business-states in Indonesia, truly a fascinating chapter: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanfang_Republic

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These Chinese with their sneaky investing, integrating, and appreciating foreign cultures. Why can't they bomb them to the stone age or overthrow dictators to foment indefinite, end-stateless sectarian conflicts like real freedom loving countries?

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nice artikel , wait for your new artikel jeje

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