Will private K-12 schools be reopening?

“As of July 22, pretty much across the board, [private] schools are planning for some sort of in-person learning in the fall,” said Amy McNamer, executive director of the Association of Independent Schools of Greater Washington, which supports 76 private schools in the region. “And I have to add this big caveat that that could change,” she said.

In online forums, parents are asking one another for advice about private schools, saying they fear that virtual learning at their public schools will be a disaster.

Here is much more from The Washington Post.  Of course you will note that private decisions doth not a social optimum make.  Nonetheless these particular private decisions do internalize the risks to children, parents (grandparents?), and teachers, albeit not the case load of broader society.

And those institutions are planning on reopening.  We’ll see if they get there.

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Private schools do not in general have teacher's unions.

Public school teachers will be WFH (working from home). 😉

Tyler takes his iron rice bowl for granted, and probably will until the only businesses at his local mini-mall are a Biden for President storefront and an Amazon distribution center. Of course public school teachers are pro-shutdown. Of course private school teachers are against. When nobody knows anything why not just go with your self interest?

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If public school teachers weren't going to be paid for WFH, somehow I think there would be less opposition to reopening schools.

It will be informative to see how many private schools are able to convince parents to pay for virtual instruction, informative about the merits of virtual instruction.

Doesn't The Science tell us that younger teachers are less susceptible than older teachers to the most severe symptoms of covid-19? To the extent that union seniority and age-discrimination rules prevent replacing older teachers with younger teachers, should we follow The Science or unions?

Teachers who know they will get paid regardless, forever, almost all want to teach remotely. Workers whose employers might go under if they don't actually provide the service (read: private schools) are going to try to rise to the challenge. Bryan Caplan said it well "not even daycare"
Here's an extra layer: private schools could both raise prices and reduce enrollment to create a safer less-crowded environment.
Furthermore: we could utilize spaces like movie theaters to create new safe private schools, if we had the imagination.

It must be a long time since "movie theaters" and "imagination" were used in the same sentence. Or, at least, used as judiciously as they were here.

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They are all operating on a wing and a prayer. Unless there is effectively no community spread, the notion that the private schools will be able to maintain sufficient discipline to prevent infections from spreading is laughable. Just look at the Miami Marlins. Not impossible that I turn out to be wrong, and it may well be the case that someone should take a chance, but it defies common sense to think that with level of spread we have right now pretty much across the country, this will end well.

We don't have to guess, we can simply look to those countries that did not close their schools despite significant community spread.

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You are assuming the kids won't connect if there's not school. In fact, they still do. Kids are not in school, but most are still at a friends house in a sweaty bedroom playing xbox til 3 in the morning.

We've got the worst of all worlds: The kids that need school the most are still actively mixing, and they aren't doing anything school related. And they are falling further behind their peers, whose parents care a lot and have organized study pods with other parents.

Covid means the smarter get even smarter, and those that need the most help get reject it while still catching covid.

And our elites are signing up for this, 100% so they can hopefully screw Trump in November.

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We’ll see if they get there.

Of course they have an incentive to open.

Yes, they have an incentive to open. Private schools want to survive and they know there is a demand to meet. Their managers and teachers want to survive at least as much as you and they need a salary to do it. What about you? How do you survive? Do you get a check from some government program? Do you rely on politicians and bureaucrats to survive? Tell us your story before posing as a good and wise guy.

Indeed, many parents (by no means all parents) know that they are taking many risks sending their children to school, particularly to public schools where any idiot can be hired to manage or teach, where any classmate attends regardless of willingness and ability to learn as well as of disposition to meddle or not in other lives. And now those parents know that their children will be exposed to COVID-19. I'm sure those parents will pay attention to the new risk and attempt to protect their children and to do it, they will question the school managers and teachers knowing that at best they also care about the children but not as much as they care.

In public schools, unions are responsible for imposing conformity to any agreement between their leaders and Dem politicians (except for Biden who is under the bed). Why are parents going to trust them?

I worked at both a public school and a top private school on the east coast. The only difference is that the private school has a better marketing department. Private schools have been trying to stay alive for decades with every move they can, other than actual innovation in education. Private schools talk a great game to get you to become a lifetime tuition paying sucker. In the end all private schools care about is their finances. I have seen countless decisions made by administration that directly hurt students and student learning simply because it makes them more money. This is that case where administrations see an opportunity for a bait-and-switch. I can almost guarantee most of these private schools that say they are in person now, will be virtual in the fall AFTER they collected the first tuition payment and had families sign a contract where there are no refunds for the year.

Then, one way to expose this private school bait-and-switch scam would be for public schools to announce that, should public schools go virtual, then taxpayers will get a refund.

Lol!
Ten internet points for you.

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n the end all private schools care about is their finances.

So exactly like public schools - except they have to get results and they are willing to fire sex offenders even when they are not also manifestly incompetent.

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Private schools have been trying to stay alive for decades with every move they can, other than actual innovation in education. P

Schools don't need innovation. They need serious course content fixed performance standards, and tracking. To have that, you need teachers and administrators who aren't ninnies, who respond to obstreperous students with sanctions, and who respond to obstreperous parents by telling them to not let the door hit their a** on the way out.

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Steve, you are confused.

Customers of private schools, wealthy parents, are buying the student body.

You have to be able to identify the product.

You can be forgiven. After all, you have "worked" in schools, public and private, but clearly not in the marketing department.

My college educated Afro-Brazilian sister-in-law talked a good game about the benefits of diversity, until it was time to send her son to high school. Though the public high school with a "diverse" student body, in other words it actually had some non-latino (non-Mexican) students, was only a few hundred feet from her door, she sent her son, who looks like Colin Kapernick, to the far away private school. The price she had two pay was two inconvenient car trips a day in heavy traffic.

The two main attractions of the private school are:
1. Student's average test scores on standard exams.
2. They have never found a loaded gun in a student locker.

The public school is better funded and has outstanding athletic facilities, theaters, and music programs, including jazz bands, marching bands, and orchestras. The school gets more money per pupil from the state because of the "diverse" student body.

The private school has non of that - it is a lean operation.

You're welcome.

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'Tell us your story before posing as a good and wise guy.'

Talk about projection concerning what is nothing but a straightforward observation.

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So you worked for *a* private school, and based on that *single school* you've extrapolated that behavior to every private school in the country, despite having observed no additional data.

Let me guess. You taught science, didn't you.

Even based upon his history, he's basically saying that the school which got millions in free government dollars per year aren't concerned with their finances, schools that don't obviously are.

That's nearly tautological.

It's the equivalent of saying my trust fund friends are happy go lucky and have plenty of time to do fun stuff and party all night, but those assholes that are working are always complaining we're too loud and that they need to get some sleep to go to work the next day. And they are always so uptight about everyone paying their share of the rent, food and utilities. All they ever care about is finances and trying to ensure they have lifetime employment. Then when they do collect the rent & utilties money up front and pay the landlord, they won't give any of it back if one of us decides to move out half way through the lease.

Ouch (!), but good.

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You are very correct. That is one data point. I have also works closely with the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) and the Association of Independent Maryland and DC Schools (AIMS) on innovation initiatives and have seen countless schools operating in a very similar way. One is a dot, two is a line, three is a trend, and I have many more than three data points to work with. Unfortunately since private schools are independent there is no data to look at their practices as a whole, and individual schools don't have incentive to promote anything outside their marketing strategy. There is no science to determining the value of private school. That is why tuition has skyrocketed. I wish there was better data to analyze in education. Unfortunately it just doesn't exist.

"I have also works ..."

Now THAT is funny!

Tell the truth, this is a comedic setup!

You can't make this sh*t up!

"There is no science to determining the value of a private school."

And yet smart people somehow figure it out.

"Like most wealthy people, I send my kids to private schools." - Reed Hastings. California Board of Education member for four years and Netflix CEO

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The Republican covid relief bill released on July 27 includes funding for schools, public and private, the bulk of such funding conditioned on reopening. Also, some Republican senators (led by Senator Alexander) are pushing for increased aid to private schools to pay for tuition. Biden has proposed a separate $30 billion appropriation just for reopening costs. As for the cost of reopening, a recent analysis predicts that preparing for reopening schools (cleaning, masks, extra buses, etc.) could cost about $1.7 million for an average school district. https://www.asbointl.org/asbo/media/documents/Resources/covid/COVID-19-Costs-to-Reopen-Schools.pdf

The riots in Seattle, Portland, etc are a direct consequence of PC public education, all downstream of the Postodernist, Critical (fill-in-the-blank) Theory, intersectionalist sh*t fed into the education system from schools of education all the way down to pre-school.

The best thing you can do for your kids is to yank them out of public school asap before it's too late.

It might be too late already.

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Of course, any financial assistance to school must be conditioned on opening. Those managers and teachers that don't want to work, they can stay home and collect any unemployment insurance available or they can go out to work in jobs that meet their preference for safety requirements. That is what we have been doing for the past 10,000 years.

Too many people have lost their jobs or have their incomes reduced by governments' responses to COVID-19. Why should some people be promised the same income as before COVID-19 without working?

We should also remove all modern medicine, electronics, farming etc. If it wasn't around 10000 years ago it's too good for other people today.

Are you the same Jerry Nadler that didn't hear what Barr had to say?

Survival of the fittest. If a few teachers die it's a small price to pay and a good learning lesson for kids to not get a job where they are at the mercy of others. Everyone needs to be an entrepreneur and millionaire or be quiet.

Or phrased another way:

Survival of the fittest. If a few million children don't get a good education it's a small price to pay to prevent a few teachers from dying. It's a good learning lesson for kids to not be at the mercy of others.

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"...or they can go out to work in jobs that meet their preference for safety requirements. "

That would eliminate replacing all the retiring police officers, anything that involves driving a call, most manual labor ….

Pretty much everything is less dangerous than teaching, probably even during COVID.

But you certainly must be wrong. Haven't we all read the constant jeremiads from teachers telling us that there is no price to pay, no sacrifice so great, no risk so high that teachers don't already face on a daily basis (probably before 8am). I had become convinced that they love their jobs and wild horses couldn't drag them from those kids.

Heck, I have heard their "buying their own supplies" whine so many damn times, i would have though that just paying for crayons would have given them decades of motivation.

I have nothing against the teachers who aren't constantly whining, but it does seem like a lot do. But from the statistics I've read it is a decent little job with fair pay.

Yes, Jack is (or at least used to be) a decent little job with fair pay. Today most teachers (or at least unionized teachers) want the same fair pay but staying at home (perhaps feigning to teach "online") because of the higher risk of in-person teaching due to Covid-19. Many people with the same fear for Covid-19 have been forced to stay home without their fair pay, however. If they were given the choice to return to work and earn their fair pay or stat at home, I assume many of them will return to work. Teachers should be offered that choice. Also, customers of all business, including schools and universities, should have the choice --as in normal times-- of buying or not buying.

We still know little about the virus, the disease, and the pandemic. We know, however, enough to make people responsible for the Covid-19 consequences of their actions the same way that we are responsible for the consequences of all our actions, including the civil responsibility we usually assume when our actions hurt others unintentionally.

Agreed! And if they don't want to teach it's easy to find replacements. Drop the stupid requirements and training and bring in people who will teach the basics like they used to.

They whine about the long term health affects! They should have thought of that before they decided to be teachers! The job is the job. Suck it up or don't let the door hit you on the butt on the way out.

Obvious trolling is obvious

Then why do you do it?

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"We have MASTER'S DEGREES" (MA.ed at Degree Mill U, earned via course credits that also counted toward continuing ed and all expenses paid by district.)

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I worked at a top private school on the East Coast and I can tell you first hand that private schools are great at storytelling, not so great at execution. They are pulling a move out of the higher ed playbook that Scott Gallaway wrote about - https://www.profgalloway.com/higher-ed-enough-already.

Many private schools have a clause in their contract that if families sign on for the school year, they don't get any sort of refund. Private schools are going to say they will be opening to get the tuition payments from all of the families stuck in limbo. As soon as they have the contracts signed they will announce they are going virtual.

If you want to send your kids to have in person learning at an institution with no clear plan for COVID flareups, then by all means spend your money on an overpriced education that is driven by marketing. The high level administration making decisions care about one thing and one thing only, money.

Private schools have been on the decline for decades. This is the last lifeline they see before many of them go under.

So you think that private schools' managers and teachers are as mendacious and hypocrites as Pelosi and Co. Also, you think that there are still enough idiots to send their children to private schools managed by swindlers like the Obamas of this world and therefore "we" have to prevent the idiots to be preyed.

I think there are too many people willing to earning a living by stealing those that work. I wonder, however, how swindlers choose their victims. Let us assume I want to be a swindler and have to choose between the heavy up-front cost of establishing a school and the light up-front cost of running for elected positions, under what conditions would I choose the first one?

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Private school enrollment looks pretty flat from 2000-2018. That despite a growth in charter schools. Small drop in enrollment after Great Recession that rebounded by 2018. https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/pdf/coe_cgc.pdf

My own experience with private school was great. My parents paid about $12k/semester about 12 years ago. The public schools in my town were awful, gang-filled, drug filled prisons. Drug dogs routinely roamed the hallways. At my school, too many detentions for an untucked shirt got you suspended and a fight, drug use, or a mean MySpace post meant expulsion.

I also don’t buy the only real argument for not reopening school in the article posted: off campus activity. Doesn’t apply for grade school.

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New cases have leveled off the last week+, so it's likely cases will be down significantly in a month.

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I went to a fancy private and my kids go to public because I am not as wealthy as my parents. The education they are getting is not even close to what I got in private. My teachers were 10X better, the assignments far more sophisticated, and most of all they made us write and rewrite constantly. My kid in all Ap and honors classes writes < 5 essays a year in a highly rated public school.

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I was approached a while back to teach an advanced elective or two for the local high school (the big idea being anatomy and physiology). I currently hold an adjunct professorship at a medical school and have previously taught anatomy and pathophysiology to MD and PhD students.

According the regs, I am well qualified to teach biology teachers.

Yet I was not able to teach anatomy at a public school, even when volunteering to do so at no pay. I was willing to provide the sort of experience that goes really over really well with medical school admissions committees and help advanced students get a jump start on any medical studies they want (e.g. RN, BSN, MD, DO). Depending on the rules we might have even managed do a small amount of dissection and taught them skills that would be immediately helpful for partaking in undergraduate research.

And we were turned down cold. The union made a fuss about my lack of a teaching credential and we were unable to get insurance coverage for the instruction absent either a formal class offering or me being formal faculty.

In contrast my private school was cheaper than public school, had better performance on tests, college placement, and job outcomes. Our scholarship kids outperformed the public school's best kids. And exactly the sort of thing I tried to pay forward was undertaken with minimal muss or fuss (though I doubt I could get high schoolers into coroner dissections these days).

If private schools are all just marketing, then let's see it. Give the parents the right to take half their child's annual public school spend and dump it into parochial tuition. See if there is not a stampede to that exit.

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Tyler, forget about reading WP. Given what is going on in your country, I suggest you approach the problem of reopening schools and universities from the perspective of inclusion v. isolation (about the relevant isolation read H. Arendt). I think there is a fundamental contradiction in the political position of those that today oppose reopening schools and universities. They want much more isolation even at the cost of sacrificing the appearance of inclusion associated with attending schools and universities. Please, help them and solve for the equilibrium.

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My son’s private preschool was open almost the whole time, with the justification that some parents are essential workers and needed a place to send their kids. We voluntarily pulled our son out for 3.5 months. That period was miserable for us: our work, personal time, and our kids all suffered somewhat. Sending the kids back to school in July has been a huge relief. Another private preschool nearby got a PPP loan, closed for a little while, and refunded parents their tuition. They are open again now.

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I think regardless of what the schools are planning or actually do, the quality of education is broadly going to take a hit for most students. To me the longer term concern is what is the plan to remediate the learning for what is turning out to be at least a 12-18 month lull in learning once everyone is finally back in the classroom. Or, will that offer a new marketing and branding opportunity for privates?

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I'm not opposed to magical thinking. I engage in it from time to time. Indeed, anyone residing in a hurricane zone, as I do, is engaging in magical thinking. In economics, the entrepreneur must engage in magical thinking, especially the entrepreneur who opens a restaurant. Thank goodness for magical thinking by restaurant entrepreneurs! Restaurant entrepreneurs will open a restaurant at the very location where many before him have failed. Did he not hear about it? School reopening requires magical thinking, just like the economy reopening. We have just witnessed the error of magical thinking in the case of economic reopening, but it doesn't dim the spirits of those engaged in magical thinking about school reopening. Reopening a failed restaurant reflects confidence and ambition, reopening schools reflects magical thinking. From what I have read about our president, he is only capable of magical thinking. Reality would violate the most important lesson he learned from his mentor Norman Vincent Peale: the power of magical thinking.

-1

Read the papers on transmission via children and try again

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I continue to fail to understand the line of reasoning that says opening up the economy was a mistake. It seems to account only for the cost in terms of COVID cases and deaths and ignore all benefits.

Fauci is the absolute worst example of this: speaking about the Marlin's COVID outbreak, ""This could put it [the MLB season] in danger." Public health officials should NOT be making economic policy, dictating personal decisions, and definitely not business decisions for sports leagues!

Exactly how many people more you want to kill?

What is your counterfactual? Do you think closing bars will prevent the people frequenting those places from congregating elsewhere? Do you think kids will not hang out with each other and their family just because school is closed? Do you think large venues will reopen if all lock downs and restrictions on gathering size went away tomorrow? Do you think many retail establishments will remove mask requirements any time soon? How many lives do you think are being saved by government intervention vs. the alternative?

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Nigel,

Opening up the economy only applies to the 33% of the economy that shut down. 33% of people started working at home with minimal impact. 33% of people were essential workers and continued to work as they always had. It was the remaining 33% that shut down. So make sure in your analysis you keep in mind that 2/3 of the economy continued on as normal.

True,

"The GDPNow model estimate for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the second quarter of 2020 is -32.1 percent on July 29"

https://www.frbatlanta.org/cqer/research/gdpnow

But of course, it 2/3rds are already working then sending the other 3rd back to work won't make too big a difference in Covid numbers either.

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Exactly how many more people you want to save?

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But the main requirement seems to be a reluctance to carry your share of the tax load and the inconvenience. A little disgruntlement because nobody teaches readin and writin and rithmetic any more doesn't hurt.

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The devil's is in the details.

1. If a school re-opens, does it take precautions , i.e. like smaller class size?

2. If the school chooses smaller class size, does it have the budget of space, supplies, and staff to do so? Where does that money come from? Where do those teachers come from to cover smaller class sizes and illness/quarantine vacancies?

3. Once a school opens, does it re-close if thresholds are exceeded? i.e. what does it do if ten kids in a class are sick? What if two teachers are sick? This is a health protocol question, but also, importantly, a logistics question.

4. The reality is, an in-school program will actually be a hybrid program. There will be rolling shifts back and forth between school and home from time to time, and from full-time to part-time. (assuming some health protocols are followed) (assuming testing is available). Schools will also be required to offer an in-home option of some flavor. So, in effect, choosing to run an in-school program actually means choosing both in-school and home programs. Simultaneously. The worst of both worlds.

5. There's a fair question of the quality of the in-school experience. There will be lots of change and disruption. Unqualified teachers and subs covering classes outside their expertise. No recess. Limited social mixing. Eating lunch at their desks. etc.

6. What happens the first time a student (or beloved teacher) at the school end up on a ventilator? How does that impact future participation by students and teachers?

The logistics required to run an in-school system is massive. Constant change in enrollment, schedule allocation, and teacher availability due to illnesses and quarantines. Rolling closures and quarantines.

One month in, it seems likely that some in-school classes will experience infection outbreaks. What then? Send the kids home for two weeks, then bring them back, test again, send some more home... how the hell do parents and administrators plan around that?

The only way it seems remotely sustainable to do in-school classes is to go "all-in." Which means limited protocols and closer to "normal" behavior. Which means comparatively larger class size, and limited use of preemptive quarantines, and simply combining classes when a teacher gets sick, drafting "specials" teachers to run classes etc.

That's the dirty little secret of in-school learning this fall. It will be glorified day care. And will be pushing the boundaries on protocols (to the extent of ignoring them). Kids will be shuttled around from room to room and school to home as conditions dictate.

(That serves an important economic purpose for their parents, but let's be honest about what it serves and does not serve. It won't be quality education).

Don't get me wrong. Last spring was a disaster for our kids, and really tough on us as parents too. And I am fully aware that I am privileged as a professional who can work from home.

PS. It is not fair to evaluate what remote learning looks like based on last spring's emergency shutdown. The clock on this project starts now.

PS 2. No form of remote learning works without government help to parents economically.

PS 3. Be real about what kids are capable of. They do not social distance. In school, or at home. Be real about parents too: these protocols break down in routine environments.

PS 4. So what "back to school" really is, is an argument for "tough love" return to normal in the school sector. Abandon protocols, ignore outbreaks, and shuttle kids around as teachers come and go.

PS 5. I am watching MLB baseball with interest. They are running a live experiment with the complexities of logistics and reality of controlling spread in a highly mobile, medium-contact environment. The recent outbreak among the Marlins will be interesting to observe.

The evidence so far shows children aren’t a risk of transmission. I’m not including high school in this. So:

1. Smaller class sizes, probably irrelevant and unnecessary

2. Is irrelevant and unnecessary

3. Kids seem to get less sick from Covid compared to influenza

4. Private schools will not need to offer an in home option. This post is about private schools. Public schools will be closed based on partisan makeup of the area as the determinant

5. Question of quality, sure. But there’s no question as to the quality of virtual k-8. Half the kids in LAUSD never bothered to log in more than what....once a month?

6. I don’t know, what happens when private school teachers get cancer or HIV? Let the parents decide

Public schools are another thing entirely. Parents that care will Pod Up, parents that don’t will leave their kids to roam. Same as it ever was, but more so

:"But there’s no question as to the quality of virtual k-8. Half the kids in LAUSD never bothered to log in more than what....once a month?"

Our kids start virtual school in a couple of weeks. I'm fairly pessimistic. They are elementary age, and they don't have the attention span to do any kind of virtual schooling very long.

clearly everyone will have to and plans to do differently than last spring

there will be much more intensive teacher-student engagement, check ins, etc

and pods will be central for those who can

working parents esp the poor will get screwed. no doubt about that

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I’ll ignore your nonseq re staying strictly on topic. this post has already devolved into contrasting public vs private and a lot of gratuitous public school and union bashing.

are you accepting the latest theory on child spread as settled science? if that turns out to be premature, does your view change?

eventually somewhere a kid and/or teacher will end up on a vent. then all bets are off. watch those $12k/yr tuition parents yank their kids out by lunch time and demand a refund.

PS what does participation by LA PS kids have to do with private schools?

If evidence comes in that kids do significantly contribute to spread then yes, that changes the equation.

Someone somewhere will get sick, that’s an inevitability at this point with ~40 million cases. That’s up to the school and parents.

There’s little to no question as to how effective k-8 virtual school has been. It’s been a disaster. The situation in LAUSD is to give an example of how it works in practice.

Union bashing is stupid, the whole point is to represent their members’ interests. If they didn’t they would be a terrible union.

It’s not union bashing to note that their interests do not always align with the interests of the public or parents

The problem here is it's a massive gamble, if kids turn out to be the little germ vessels they usually are, we've put all or money on one horse.

You are correct there will be inevitable severe infections, and then it will be up to parents and schools, and teachers. My expectation is for some of those equations will handle it well. Others will melt down.

Private schools don't necessarily always have the public's (or parents') best interests in mind either.

If we're not going to use scientific evidence to make cost/benefit analyses that inform our decision making, then there's no point in debating anything at all.

Where does that leave us?

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We already know we don't need to worry about all that because of daycares. Obviously all the same questions would apply there and they've been fine.

i’ve not seen much analysis about daycare one way or the other.

is there evidence that they’ve been “fine”?

and, as i said, if the standard for schools is merely as daycare, then thats a very low bar

Not sure what you mean about a low bar. I certainly don't think that schools will have MORE kids up in everyone's face breathing on them and spitting in their mouths than daycares.

The fact that you haven't heard anything about it means its fine. If everyone was getting COVID from daycares and dying, you would have heard about it. I heard one story that a few thousand people had gotten COVID in daycares in Texas and most were the workers. But obviously they are managing that as they all remain open.

Daycare is a very broad and highly heterogeneous topic. Like nursing care, some are little more than minimum wage assembly lines, others are top shelf.

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"private decisions doth not a social optimum make"

Asinine. The biggest single killer in the US response this far has been the governmental decision to force sick elderly patients into nursing homes. Local governments all jumping on board with the notion that "protesting in close proximity won't get you sick as long as your cause is just" is now producing a wave of cases (look at Washington and Oregon). To widespread acclaim from all the best people, brigades of nurses turned out to shame the protests that didn't make people sick but not the ones that have. Private actors aren't obliged to defer to someone else's notion of a social optimum that is being wielded in patently bad faith.

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Private Schools ^= bus routes (with reduced capacity/distancing, mask requirements, screening/temperature checks, etc etc)

Solve for equilibrium,Tyler

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"Of course you will note that private decisions doth not a social optimum make."

It is a proper role of government to align incentives for the public good.

(Carrot preferred to stick, of course.)

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$40k+/year will pay for a lot of masks, COVID tests, healths screenings, smaller classes, etc.

What's the average elementary private school tuition?

$10K per year according to this site

https://www.privateschoolreview.com/tuition-stats/private-school-cost-by-state

Not in NYC it isn't.

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The real laugher is deBlasio saying opening schools is to risky and then announcing plans to provide day care for 100K children at community centers etc to have a place to put school children- no risk of transmission there-I guess in that respect it’s like a protest while school is like a church- way too dangerous

Yeah, that's almost sex with demons level crazy.

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"The real laugher is deBlasio saying opening schools is to risky and then announcing plans to provide day care for 100K children at community centers"

I think you misunderstood de Blasio. He meant it's too dangerous for the teachers. Those are the voters/donors his policies are meant to appeal to.

Woah,

"New deaths in the United States from CV-19 increased by 49 percent over the last 14-day period."

But concern about that is just for

"the voters/donors his policies are meant to appeal to."

Shouldn't that be all voters at this point?

From:

https://twitter.com/peterwsinger/status/1288469958905729024?s=19

"Shouldn't that be all voters at this point?"

Of course. But can you explain to me logically why schools are too dangerous to open but community centers providing day care is acceptable?

If that's where you were coming from, I agree.

I was just getting a big "this is fine" vibe off this page, from people who seem to want to send kids back to (private) schools even in hot areas (21 states now).

This still is a major public health crisis, and not at all under control. We should see more emphasis on stronger policies, and not opening up in the face of increase.

The equilibrium seems to be policies that are both extremely costly and ineffective.

In a California High Speed Rail kind of way

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We have to trust the science which says schools are not a significant transmission risk. To minimize the cost to human life we have to take the precautions that get us the most bang for the buck, and closing school is definitely not one of them. By the time school starts, new cases are quite likely to be down substantially in any case.

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JW- so no adults at the day care sites? That will work fine! If there are adults why is that acceptable to risk them but not teachers? If there are kids & adults there- lets teach them & call it “school”.

"JW- so no adults at the day care sites? "

The point being that the adults at the day care center aren't members of the politically powerful New York teachers' unions. Politicians respond to incentives.

I agree, the whole point is it highlights deBlasio’s mendacity

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Everyone is talking about opening schools, but I wonder about what students are going to do for activities- college app resumes are going to be pretty sparse for the next few incoming college student classes.

"college app resumes are going to be pretty sparse for the next few incoming college student classes."

They might just have to rely solely on academic merit.

That's hilarious, look at the UCs, they are going to select only on race.

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Should be lots of opportunities to provide online tutoring and homework help.

Shovel snow during the winter in some places.

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“private decisions doth not a social optimum make”

Well then, Adam Smith stands refuted.

Tyler must be so very desperate to get a Biden Administration post.

Interestingly enough, Smith had an argument for public education, recognizing the positive externalities of markets, of course.

Interesting. Thank you.

But nowadays:

“ “The man whose whole life is spent in performing a few simple operations, of which the effects are perhaps always the same, or very nearly the same, has no occasion to exert his understanding or to exercise his invention in finding out expedients for removing difficulties which never occur. He naturally loses, therefore, the habit of such exertion, and generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become. The torpor of his mind renders him not only incapable of relishing or bearing a part in any rational conversation, but of conceiving any generous, noble, or tender sentiment, and consequently of forming any just judgment concerning many even of the ordinary duties of private life.“

sounds pretty much like government schooling.

It might be interesting to contrast 1770s style "torpor" with that of today, but certainly the theory behind ~200 years of public education is that an educated citizenry provides all kinds of positive externalities.

To borrow a phrase, "Adam Smith stands [UN]-refuted."

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this week in pangolin history
-democratic leftists have decided the riots, free speech, cancel culture and free are a myth
- Attorney General Barr elegantly showed the rest of the country how crooked& dumb the house judiciary committee is

+1

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Brave talk. Let's see what actually happens in the fall. Notice the words: "Some sort of in-person"

We're going to have a fall flue season, with a delay in testing for covid. Is it covid or the flue? Kid is sick and infects others. Oh, we'll stay open.

Spitting in the wind.

Do you think any private business would not have an interest to assert they will be open in person--now is the time people pick the private school--but know that they will probably go online after they get the kid in the door.

Do you believe a public school Superintendent who has no financial interest over a private school administrator whose income will be lower if fewer kids don't show up.

What does the flu have to do with anything? There's a flu season every year, but the schools have never closed.

Tom, Are you unaware that people who have the flu may think they have covid? That testing takes time for returns, if available. Do a little more reading about the issue of flu/covid problems next fall.

Here's a hint: Teacher experiences flu symptoms, identical to covid. Doesn't show up for work until after covid test returns. Or, kid experiences same, but parents don't tell others or get test.

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In my experience, discipline is better at private schools, so enforcing social distancing, mask usage, etc., should be easier.

Private schools can enforce mask wearing, public schools can't. Our school system district has already announced to rather harsh criticism, that legally they can require students to wear a mask on the bus, but if the student refuses to wear it they still have to take them to school. However, the student will be subject to discipline including not being able to ride the bus in the future.

Furthermore, and much more importantly they can't force the students to wear masks in the school itself. The lawyers have told them that a student's right to an education trumps a legal requirement to wear a mask.

Well, quit listening to litigious swine.

The students aren't in danger from this virus. A selection of the employees are. Have your employees in fresh N-95s each day.

"Well, quit listening to litigious swine."

Welcome to 21st century America.

Low trust gonna low trust.

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According to Tyler, that's the social optimum.

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“COVID doesn’t affect children.” You may want to rethink that.
-Anonymous physician

Walking into the COVID ward in the children’s hospital, those words seemed etched on an invisible wall, a wall that I wanted to choose to stay behind. It was a wall I could stay behind for the first couple months of the pandemic where multiple studies touted how children weren’t getting sick, and my hospital had seen very few mild cases of the virus in children manifesting from a fever in infants to asymptomatic infection in teenagers. Even when I had seen cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), the heart condition that affects children with coronavirus, I had been able to point to studies that showed how few children were affected. But it was my turn to be the attending physician on the COVID ward that day, so I was forced to push through that invisible wall to the other side where children affected by coronavirus waited.

My first patient had been transferred out of the pediatric ICU, where he had been on high flow nasal cannula (a non-invasive ventilator) and had received Remdesivir and steroids for pneumonia caused by the virus. His mother could not be with him because she, too, has coronavirus. I call her on the phone. She has so many questions: “How will the virus affect his lungs in a year, in two years, as an adult?” “Will he have any heart damage?” “How long will we have to give him blood thinners?” At first, I simply say, “I don’t know.” Finally, I say, “No one knows. I wish that we knew.” The mother says, “But I thought that coronavirus didn’t affect children.”
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My second patient I had first met in the emergency room when she was breathing like she had just finished a marathon though she was lying in bed. I had placed her on high flow nasal cannula and sent her to the ICU where she had received all the things my first patient received, the things we normally use for adults because coronavirus doesn’t affect children. Her mother also had COVID but had begged the hospital to allow her to stay with her sick child.

My third patient, like the first, was alone in his room. His mother had COVID, and his father was in the ICU with COVID. He huffed and puffed, struggling with COVID pneumonia, and bravely told me he could learn how to inject himself with blood thinners since his parents were also sick. He can inject himself, alone, at home, because COVID doesn’t affect children.

My fourth patient was being transferred out of the children’s ICU. She had been there for two weeks and had received convalescent plasma (antibodies from patients who had recovered from COVID), Anakinra (an inhibitor of a chemical that is released during the body’s inflammatory reaction to the virus), steroids, and Remdesivir. She is on multiple forms of insulin now and may develop diabetes because COVID doesn’t affect children. She had been intubated (with a tube down her throat that was connected to a ventilator) but was now on high flow nasal cannula and able to speak. She repeated, “mama?”, over and over again. Her mother was also recovering from COVID, and her father was in the ICU with COVID. “Mama” would not come that day because COVID doesn’t affect children.

I continue rounding on my other COVID patients, recalling an article that I’d just read about how coronavirus didn’t affect the 17,000 children infected with it in Florida because coronavirus doesn’t affect children.

In John Barry’s, The Great Influenza, he comments that “the biggest problem [of a pandemic] lies in the relationship between governments and the truth.” He talks about how politicians have a duty to tell the truth to the public and how covering up the truth actually leads to more fear, not less. But as a physician, I wonder, are we also willing to tell the truth? It is especially hard during these times, when each scientific study’s results seem to contradict the next. It is especially hard when we have to admit as physicians that we don’t know, that no one knows. It is hard when we have to admit that our hypothesis may be wrong. But in admitting that a hypothesis may be wrong, there is a way forward for discovering the truth. Looking at my own healthy children, there is a part of me that still clings to the idea that coronavirus doesn’t affect children, but as the physician on the COVID ward today, I know I need to allow for the possibility that maybe, just maybe, that hypothesis is wrong.

-1 prior, for a massive strawman post

“COVID doesn’t affect children.”

Who exactly on this thread our you responding too? Which poster used that phrase?

Yes, posts like these just highlight how prior never cared about children dying in traffic or of the flu.

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While there isn’t much data the data I have seen is that an order of magnitude more kids died THIS flu season from the flu than COVID. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic many children died compared to our current pandemic but we kept them in school

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This is supposed to be an economics website, so you might understand the role of advertising, including deceptive advertising, in luring the naive to your product offering.

So, let's say you own a personal service business...say, a private school...and you know that there would be a different demand response to two offerings: in-person and online.

And, let's say, you could announce your intention to go in-person, but, in fact you knew, that you might and probably would, go online (either because the state mandated it or because public schools shifted to online after opening in person): Would you announce: We are going online or we are going to open in person. Of course you would say you are opening in person, because you will attract students to your product, and you can later retreat to online "because you had to".

Of course, you don't get your money back. Sorry.

That's exactly what my public school did. They announced that parents could choose all-virtual or default into doing half the week in person. One-third of parents chose all-virtual. But the teachers complained about being expected to work like grocery employees, so the superintendent switched everyone to all-virtual, even while expressly acknowledging in his announcement that cases are dropping in our region. I don't get my money back either.

If the school promises the fall will be in-person, but they want you to sign a contract saying "no refunds", don't do it.

Unless the promise is enforceable, it isn't a promise.

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Tom T.

Your public school had no financial incentive to lie or misrepresent, whereas the private school can represent they will be in person in order to attract your business, but, once in the door, they have no obligation to remain so.

As for the public schools, you don't get money back either way, so there is less incentive to misrepresent and more of an incentive to act without regard to the dollar bills. That's not the same for a private school. They want to attract, or at least, keep students, and they can change on a dime once the kids are in the door.

Public schools receive Federal money based upon student attendance in half day increments.

"Your public school had no financial incentive to lie or misrepresent, "

That's obviously wrong.

"A critical report finds that four Chicago high schools grossly inflated student attendance records to boost their government funding. ...The inspector general recommends the firing of former Orr principal Tyese Sims and Manley principal Trista Harper. "

https://wgntv.com/news/cps-4-high-schools-fraudulently-inflated-attendance-records/

So, when schools closed last April, your interpretation of the law is that federal money should have been withheld for that period, and that Trump would not have to create an Executive Order.

No excuses though for falsifying records.

Typical Bill, when he's directly proven wrong he attempts to change the subject.

Let's recap:

Bill says something wrong that he could have checked with 30 seconds of searching.

Bill - "Your public school had no financial incentive to lie or misrepresent,"

I posted a logical rebuttal on why his statement was wrong.
"Public schools receive Federal money based upon student attendance in half day increments."

Then a quote that provided evidence it was wrong and a link to said quote.

Did he admit that he had been wrong? Did he show the slightest concern for a good faith argument? No and No,

What did he do? He tried to change the subject.

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"Of course, you don't get your money back. Sorry."

Exactly! The public school in our area sent our kids home 2 months early, but they've refused to give any of our money back.

I take it you would rather give the money to the public hospital or the care of someone who got sick.

What a weird comment. No, I would rather spend the money on my kids education of course. Since, I paid for educational services that weren't received.

But realistically both the public and private schools paid for their staff, building and utilities. The money was spend even if the kids weren't there and there's no money to reclaim.

However, you in a biased fashion, made a snide comment about private schools not refunding the money. As if it were something unique to them instead of all schools.

Yeah, kids are so disabled that they cannot learn without being there.

A better approach, by the way, is to organize volunteer tutors for kids who are falling behind due to this method of instruction. I have made a proposal to the public library and the school district to align with local colleges in volunteer distance learning tutoring programs.

Let's face it JW, when the schools get closed, as they did in Israel and/or not open, as will be in some Red States, adults will have to step in and act like adults.

JW, I'll take every opportunity this fall to remind you of your statements when you see the spread from schools into the community and when you see schools close.

Talk is cheap. Unless it is someone's life, or unless it is responsible for spreading disease among a population, some of whom will die from your carelessness.

As for not getting your money back when your public schools closed, I feel sorry for you that you were unable to complete your education.

This entire comment reeks of emotionalizing and hyperbole.

But hey at least you got to irrationally blame an internet commenter for deaths, with the added bonus of ad hominem

Blah, Blah, Blah. You have no ability to make a rational argument. Try it sometime.

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"Yeah, kids are so disabled that they cannot learn without being there."

Folks, you heard it here. Leftist sarcastically implies online ed is equivalent to in person ed via union teacher. A million students can watch the same Khan Academy video simulatenously. Something tells me that Bill, the lefty scumbag, will have cry ever so hard at the prospect of the loss of Democrat sinecures should online ed be actually leveraged.

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No money back from public schools.

Indeed. They continued to employ teachers, just like the PPP reimbursed private employers to do. They continued to try and provide educational services, albeit on short notice in a fashion no one liked. And they continued to need to pay debt service the bonds on their buildings, pay for all the Chromebooks they handed out, etc.

I thought I was buying my kid's education because I'm in a municipality, the same way we're buying a German army because we're in NATO. Does this mean I have to keep paying property tax after the kids graduate?

Prior's up.

Does Germany have property tax?

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I have seen two lists of colleges that may close because of Covid-19. The most recent one concerning 19 colleges in New York.

It was interesting to see that Dartmouth and Fordham were listed. Not on the same list of course.

I think a lot of schools had better re-open. These are not marginal institutions.

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Any analysis on perverse incentives and the American Health Care system:

"Fact check: Hospitals get paid more if patients listed as COVID-19, on ventilators

"Hospitals and doctors do get paid more for Medicare patients diagnosed with COVID-19 or if it's considered presumed they have COVID-19 absent a laboratory-confirmed test, and three times more if the patients are placed on a ventilator to cover the cost of care and loss of business resulting from a shift in focus to treat COVID-19 cases."

"This higher allocation of funds has been made possible under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act through a Medicare 20% add-on to its regular payment for COVID-19 patients, as verified by USA TODAY through the American Hospital Association Special Bulletin on the topic."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2020/04/24/fact-check-medicare-hospitals-paid-more-covid-19-patients-coronavirus/3000638001/

According to Tyler, those governmental choices represent the social optimum.

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Of course you get paid more for being on the vent- ITS AN ICU ADMISSION- the cost is much much higher to care there- no hospitL in the country makes a “profit” from treating Medicare patients

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"U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that 18 people have been arrested and are facing federal charges this week for their roles in recent weeknight protests at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland."

Apparently arresting the people involved reduces their ability to damage public goods.

I won't complain about this being off topic.

But I will speculate on why a "Portland" comment is on a "COVID" page.

I think it is because "of course," those little green men were sent to make trouble for exactly this reason, to try to bump the COVID second wave off the news.

Trump and JWatts would rather have us talk about 18 arrests than 152,320 deaths.

OR, perhaps the federal agents were sent to protect federal property which was under attack nightly from armed rioters who the state chose to do nothing about.

You know, when Trump first sent troops, he used some crazy words to justify it, if I recall correctly, "violent graffiti."

It's an interesting moment to consider. A very minor property damage was elevated to "violent" in order to justify a violent response.

At the same time as a pandemic raged, killing 152,320

-1, misinformation

There are no federal troops anywhere.

The problem with these little semantic attacks is that you expose what you are.

And that certainly is not focusing on the 152,320 deaths in a constructive way.

Related:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewsolender/2020/07/27/gallup-poll-fewer-americans-identifying-as-conservatives-more-as-liberals-since-outbreak-began/#14c7f31b398f

If you want to help the conservative brand, strong answers will help more than dodges.

There is a massive difference between federal troops enforcing martial law via the Insurrection Act and 40 Federal Law Enforcement Agents playing LARP with idiots in front of a Federal Courthouse and detention center.

They're not the same thing in scope, they're not the same thing in principle, they're not the same thing whatsoever. This isn't a semantics game.

If you want to help the conservative brand, strong answers will help more than dodges.

I'm not a conservative so their brand is irrelevant to me. Let's just not pretend the 101st Airborne is marching through Portland.

Bidden will send
DHS officers into Red States
To Enforce
Mask requirements.

I read that somewhere on the internet. Riots kill fewer people than contagion.

If the mask requirements are federal law, then sure, send in the FBI

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Bidden will send
DHS officers into Red States
To Enforce
Mask requirements.

Uh, no. There's no federal law requiring masks and there will not be one in the US.

I guess you have trouble separating truth from fiction.

By the way, there is no federal law preventing protests in front of Federal buildings either. If you are on federal property that is a different matter. DHS picks up someone who only protested two blocks away and puts that person in an unmarked car.

Poe's Law for the first one.

There's certainly a law against breaching federal courthouses and starting fires. In a turn of events surprising no one with any sense, DHS was identifying specific rioters via security camera footage and observation posts (windows on the 2nd+ floor) and detaining them afterwards for questioning.

There's been one case of mistaken identity in which a protestor was mistaken for a specific rioter. He was detained, searched and released.

Prove your assertions that they identified specific persons and picked them up. Persons claimed they were randomly picked up. Do you believe that some guy was taking video and directing persons blocks away to pick up a specific person from the crowd two blocks away.

Please provide links to your assertions below.

https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/7/21/21332653/portland-oregon-protests-feds-dhs-youtube-livestream

https://www.businessinsider.com/youtube-livestream-evidence-dhs-federal-agents-portland-protest-arrest-2020-7

Lol they're using the protesters' own livefeeds. They're streaming the entire thing

The cited materials are about the arrest of one protester using Youtube footage.

You might want to drop the plural.

And, you might want to look at the ACLU filings:
JULY 22, 2020
PORTLAND, Ore. — Multiple volunteer street medics are suing the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Marshals Service, and the City of Portland for targeting and attacking them at Portland protests against police brutality. The lawsuit was filed in federal court by the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Oregon and Perkins Coie LLP.

In well-documented incidents, police and federal agents brutally attacked volunteer medics with rubber bullets, tear gas, pepper spray, batons, and flash-bangs.

“It was terrifying,” said Savannah Guest, a volunteer medic and plaintiff in the case who was seen in a viral video being attacked by federal agents while providing aid to an incapacitated bystander. “Every human being deserves help, but the federal agents showed no humanity or concern.”

The lawsuit argues that the law enforcement attacks on medics violates the First and Fourth Amendments. The ACLU of Oregon will also seek a court order prohibiting law enforcement from targeting and attacking medics again.

Here is the link: https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/aclu-sues-feds-portland-police-attacking-medics-protests

they are working on finding the CHAZ/CHOP murderers (your friends). That would make at least 3, when combined with the arrest of your arsonist friend.

Your comment doesn't make sense and is worse than a poor ad hominem. You don't know how to make a statement or argue with facts.

LOL "Persons claimed they were randomly picked up"

OK prove they were randomly picked up, as opposed to being among those protesters who have been injuring dozens of federal officers for daring to put out fires around the courthouse (as opposed to literally dying in a fire), some of whom may lose their eyesight permanently

DHS releases a new list of crimes every day

"Last week, DHS put up a metal fence around the building’s perimeter, which was later reinforced with more concrete barricades following rioters’ continuous efforts to topple and breach it. Rioters once again tried to breach the fence, but without success.

In their unabated, nightly efforts to harm federal officers and destroy federal property, rioters once again attacked with hard projectiles, commercial-grade, mortar-style fireworks, hazardous materials and lasers – which can cause permanent blindness to officers."

here's your "street medics" in action

going to court was a mistake, discovery will immediately expose them to RICO
-------
Antifa praises shooting of two black teens as victory against fascism

Witness statements about the shooting of two black teens on Monday at the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest (CHOP, formerly CHAZ) create a confusing picture that leaves more questions than answers.

In the early hours of Monday, an unknown number of armed "security" members of the so-called autonomous zone opened fire on a Jeep Cherokee SUV that had been circling the perimeter. The shooting left one 16-year-old dead, and a 14-year-old critically injured.

Before the age of the victims was known, CHOP residents claimed on camera to livestreamers present at the location that the teenagers had been performing drive-by shootings, and that the vehicle they were in was stolen. Witnesses also claimed that the vehicle's two occupants, whose identity and makeup were not known at the time, had assaulted and robbed someone while armed with knives.

Footage leading up to the incident does not corroborate these on-camera statements.

The only detail these witnesses were in agreement about was to state that CHOP "security" neutralized the vehicle, its driver, and passenger.

First details of the incident surfaced on Twitter through a user named "Malice Antifa Superstripper," who goes by @MaliceBD on the platform, who wrote:

"2 guys in a stolen SUV shot up #CHOP tonight. They came through and fired ~15 shots, then maybe 15 mins later, drove across Cal Anderson field and opened fire again... and got f***ing MURKED by security on the ground."

The poster included photos of the aftermath, which showed a vehicle badly damaged by gunfire and a bloodied interior.

Many Antifa members and supporters of the far-left movement bragged about the result, proclaiming it to be a victory against fascism.

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"I won't complain about this being off topic."

I was responding to another post that has vanished. I don't see it in this post at all, so presumably it was deleted. I do apologize for creating an off-topic post.

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But who will arrest the president? #1 in COVID-19 deaths. No, Summer is not magic.

What are the chances of Xi travelling here anyways?

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Could we get CostCo to design a school-reopening plan? Then roll out those pallets of Kirkland HCQ, masks and tests.

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Promote multiculturalism: abolish public education.

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Key word is PLANNING. As someone with kids in both our big city public school district and a private school, I've been watching the different approaches with interest. Of course the private schools can PLAN more for in-person for all the reasons you can surmise (and yes, certainly for elementary school, there was pressure to re-open as it's harder to justify a private school bill for zoom classes for a first grader). But one by one, each of the private schools in our city that had notions of starting in-person this fall have discarded those. Already it's been pushed out 3 or 4 weeks. Who knows after that, and then it will be November soon enough and the cold weather rolls in...

At the margins, yes it is obviously more likely that a private school can reopen sooner than one in a public school district. I imagine if school districts could tailor policies to individualized schools they could start to open SOME of them sooner than others. But I've grown more pessimistic as the fall approaches about there existing a consistent and reproducible method for schools successfully opening that isn't just a reflection of the extent of the outbreak around them at that time.

Private schools have a lot more freedom.

Indeed. Start with no legal obligation to serve all student equally. And no obligation to accept all comers. And the ability to tell parents to take it or leave it. And presumably the ability to force all parents to sign a waiver.

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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2020/07/26/pandemic-pods-childcare-homeschool-school-inequality/5485353002/

Some families are "poding up." Learning pods, also dubbed "pandemic pods," are small groups of families that agree to do supplementary learning or complete at-home coursework together. Sometimes they hire a tutor. Sometimes they share the supervision among parents.

-----
Parents on the job, they normally do 80% of the work anyway.

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Extra income for students

[email protected]

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Let's look at the experience in Israel from opening the schools:

"Some Israeli public-health officials are blaming the country’s decision to reopen schools in May for helping fuel a large new wave of coronavirus infections that has prompted authorities to shut down sections of the economy once again.

In recent weeks, the number of new cases of Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, has risen to around 1,500 per day nationwide from a low of fewer than 50 a day about two months ago.

The surge followed outbreaks in schools that by Monday had infected at least 1,335 students and 691 staff since the schools reopened in early May, according to the education ministry.

Epidemiological surveys by Israel’s health ministry showed that after Israel opened its entire school system without restrictions on May 17, a spike in infections occurred among the country’s youth that later spread to the general population. Government figures also showed that in the month of June schools were the second-highest known place of infection outside people’s own communities." From the WSJ: https://www.wsj.com/articles/israelis-fear-schools-reopened-too-soon-as-covid-19-cases-climb-11594760001

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Evidently Barron Trump's private school will not be reopening:

"As Trump Calls for Schools to Fully Reopen, His Son’s School Says It Will Not
St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, the private school in the Maryland suburbs attended by Barron Trump, said it was considering either a hybrid part-time plan or going back to entirely online classes."

He should demand a refund and deny all federal assistance.

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If professional sports leagues can't get it right since they also have 'an incentive' to, I don't see crammed petri dish factories (schools) with kids doing whatever with their unknown activity parents (that were probably physically going to work somewhere) doing it right either.

Lots of transmission possibilities but sports pros probably go to clubs and meet people more so maybe they are not the ideal analogy.

But there were always stories of parents that continued to drop off their kids that had the flu at daycare "because they paid for it and have to work."

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PANDEMIC•Remote work available Hartford Healthcare
This is strictly an online and work from home mom&Dad job, the working hours are flexible and you can chose to work from anywhere of your choice,the pay is $50.12 per hour training is $25.06 per hour and will be get payment by weekly via direct deposit or paycheck and the maximum amount you can work a week is 45 hours.Company name: Hartford Healthcare inc..if interested. kindly Inbox your resumes to ( [email protected]) USA ONLY. KNOW START UP FEELS. ..THANK YOU

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outcomes in a pandemic are highly contingent

on Aug 12 the Lilly Phase 2 results are allegedly due, if one or more of these pans out that could change the calculus dramatically

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04427501

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04425629?id=NCT04425629

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