What did I learn from (another) re-read of Adam Smith?

by on May 23, 2013 at 2:25 pm in Books, Economics, Education, History | Permalink

Here is my MRU video on precisely that topic.

By the way, Brandon Dupont has done for us this excellent video on John Law.

Matt May 23, 2013 at 4:23 pm

Did you realize that your fact-light conservatism/libertarianism is simply ideology masquerading as evidence based social science? I’m guessing not…

kebko May 23, 2013 at 5:05 pm

That’s your reaction to this video?

Jacob A. Geller May 23, 2013 at 7:54 pm

Um, Tyler isn’t a conservative… and he is what I would call a “fact-heavy” and “soft” libertarian, if anything.

Contemplationist May 24, 2013 at 12:31 am

Progressivism is the most fact-light, simplistic ideology of super-arrogant self-deceptive zealots ever devised. The lack of self awareness is hilarious.

dan1111 May 24, 2013 at 6:27 am

The video is heavy on facts and doesn’t appear to contain an ideological viewpoint at all. It begins and ends with qualifications (“I’m not saying these are the most important points…”; “…that’s really quite a subjective account”) and also posits that Adam Smith was a major source for Karl Marx–not exactly something you would expect to find in a shallow, ideological reading of Smith. I didn’t watch the whole Law video, but it doesn’t appear ideological either, and certainly isn’t “fact-light”.

What exactly are you responding to?

Urso May 24, 2013 at 10:04 am

You appear to be lost. The NY Times comment section is that way —–>

ricardo May 24, 2013 at 12:11 pm

<——– surely that way?

Anon May 23, 2013 at 8:25 pm

evidence based social science . . . . *snicker*

TallDave May 23, 2013 at 9:05 pm

I picked up a couple on Kindle this week. Good to see Adam Smith on Kindle.

YetAnotherTom May 23, 2013 at 9:13 pm

You can make your audio a lot smoother by recording room tone. Just record a a silent room with ac running for a minute and lay it as a separate audio track. No more”room” sound every time you speak.

George Colpitts May 24, 2013 at 12:50 pm

I guess many people prefer video but text has the following advantages:

1) we can read faster than people talk
2) text is much more easily searched and skimmed.

Greg Ransom June 7, 2013 at 1:27 pm

A pin is a production good, used in the production of clothing.

Significantly, the division of labor is embodied in production goods that extend the length of production in addition of further stages of production, extended across time in divided labor producing specialized production goods to be used in production processes closer to consumption.

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