Public Choice Outreach Conference!

The 2018 Public Choice Outreach Conference, a crash course in public choice for students planning careers in academia, journalism, law, or public policy will held June 9-10 in Arlington VA. Graduate students and advanced undergraduates are eligible to apply. Students majoring in economics, history, international studies, law, philosophy political science, psychology, public administration, religious studies, and sociology have attended past conferences. Speakers include Robin Hanson, Bryan Caplan, Shruti Rajagopolan and many others.

You can find an application and more information here. If you are a professor please invite your students to apply.

Here are some quotes from past attendees of the Outreach Conference:

It was so useful to hear such varied and intriguing aspects of public choice thought. The other members of the conference were fantastic to meet and now I’m sure we all have so many new paper ideas and updated perspectives on our original interests, thank you!

Clara Jace, Creighton University

 I found the conference insightful into many different topics. What I think was most unique about the conference was the diversity of ideas, theorems and most importantly, ideas for solutions to these prevalent problems. I think my favorite part of the econ conferences is how quick presenters are to say “I don’t know” to questions and proceed to give the analytical reasoning for both sides of the argument instead of giving a BS answer that may or may not be true. Overall, I have loved this conference.

 Jalee Blackwell, West Texas A & M, School of Business

 Wow, this conference was absolutely exceptional. It provided some of the most interesting and thought-provoking Econ lectures and conversations I have ever had the privilege of engaging in. The opportunity to have one on one discussions with some of the world’s leading minds in these fields was truly an eye opening, educational, and inspiring experience that I won’t soon forget.

 Daniel Corley, University of Texas School of Law

Comments

Such becoming modesty, considering who leads the GMU Center for Study of Public Choice, which actually is part of GMU.

However, considering some of the broken links, maybe somebody could display some leadership, and use a tool like HTTrack (which is completely free within terms of the GPL) to determine them. https://www.httrack.com/

I appreciate it wasn't the intent, but the quotes ("public choice thought") seem taken from attendees at some cult.

I'm pretty sure that's you and not the actual quotes. There pretty standard responses to how did you like the conference on X.

For example: 'Elementary Education'

It was so useful to hear such varied and intriguing aspects of 'Elementary Education'. The other members of the conference were fantastic to meet and now I’m sure we all have so many new paper ideas and updated perspectives on our original interests, thank you!

Clara Jace, Creighton University

Or 'String Theory':

It was so useful to hear such varied and intriguing aspects of 'String Theory'. The other members of the conference were fantastic to meet and now I’m sure we all have so many new paper ideas and updated perspectives on our original interests, thank you!

Clara Jace, Creighton University

Or 'Estate Law':

It was so useful to hear such varied and intriguing aspects of 'Estate Law'. The other members of the conference were fantastic to meet and now I’m sure we all have so many new paper ideas and updated perspectives on our original interests, thank you!

Clara Jace, Creighton University

They're pretty standard responses.

"They’re pretty standard responses" when it is all free; if you live in the US travel to the venue may not be that heavy on one's purse. Make the participants pay a fees and then see if the " pretty standard responses " will be of a different kind

The other day you compared our “manufactured” democracy to Russia’s sham democracy. Is your cynicism newfound or longstanding?

This is typical for eg NEH and other humanities institutes and summer programs.

What does Public Choice teach in 2018 with respect to citizen activism and responsibily?

I kinda got the idea that it was a cool kids withdrawal from active democracy, one which sadly left the field to "less rational" citizens who were willing to get out there to vote.

Maybe that is turning, but it can be close. Connor Lamb won by a few hundred votes.

Close elections are ones where it is more 'rational' (in the self-interested instrumental sense) to vote precisely because an individual vote is more likely to be the deciding vote (it was a toss up by the end). OTOH, the district is going to be redrawn by November, so it was a waste of time from that perspective.

You need to invite Nancy MacLean to a conference like this and put her on the hot seat to make her defend her 'scholarship' in the face of skeptical rather than fawning questioners.

Is one of the nights in the program, "Ethnic Restaurant Hopping in NOVA with Tyler Cowen"?

Comments for this post are closed