*Eurasian Mission*, by Alexander Dugin

by on February 14, 2017 at 1:05 am in Books, Current Affairs, Economics, History, Law, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion | Permalink

I had heard and read so much about Dugin but had never read him.  The subtitle is Introduction to Neo-Eurasianism, and here were a few of my takeaway points:

1. His tone is never hysterical or brutish, and overall this comes across as scholarly (except for the appended pamphlet on “Global Revolution”), albeit at a semi-popular level.

2. He is quite concerned with tracing the lineages of Eurasian thought, thus the “neo” in the subtitle.  Nikolai Trubetzkoy gets a lot of play.  The correct theories of history are cyclical, and the Soviet Union was lacking in spiritual and qualitative development and thus it failed.

3. Dugin is a historical relativist, every civilization has different principles of development, and we must take great care to understand the principles in each case.  Ethnicities and peoples represent “inestimable wealth” and they must be preserved against the logic of a globalized, unipolar world.

4. Geography is primary.  Russia-Eurasia is a “steppe and woods” empire, whereas America is fundamentally an Atlantic, seafaring civilization.  Globalization tries to universalize what is ultimately quite a culture-specific point of view, stemming from the American, Anglo, and Atlantic mindsets.

5. Eurasian philosophy ultimately can contain, in a Hegelian way, anti-global philosophies, as well as the contributions of Foucault, Deleuze, and Debord, not to mention List, Gesell, and Keynes properly understood.

6. “It is vitally imperative for Turkey to establish a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and Iran.”

7. The integration of the post-Soviet surrounding territories is to occur on a democratic and voluntary basis (p.51).  The nation-state is obsolete, so this is imperative as a means of protecting ethnicities and a multi-polar world against the logic of globalization.  Nonetheless Russia is to be the leader of this process.

8. “America’s influence is the most negative tendency in the world…”, and American think tanks and the media are part of this harmful push toward a unipolar world; transhumanism is worse yet.  Tocqueville, Baudrillard, and Dugin are the three fundamental attempts to make sense of America.  The Statue of Liberty resembles the Greek goddess of hell, Hecate.

9. The Eurasian economy must be subjugated to “higher civilizational spiritual values.”  City-dwellers are often a problem, as they too frequently side with the forces of globalization.

10. “Japan…is the objective leader of the Pacific.”  It must be liberated from the Atlanticist sphere of influence.  Nary a nod to China.

11. On Moldova: “Archaic?  Let it be archaic.  It’s great!”  At times he does deviate from #1 on this list.

12. Putin is his own greatest enemy because he leans too far in the liberal direction.

13. Dugin enjoys writing with bullet points.

14. “Soon the world will descend into chaos.”

Apart from whatever interest you may hold in these and other particulars, this is a good book for rethinking the notion of intellectual influence.  Very very few Anglo-American intellectuals have had real influence, but Dugin has.  That is reason enough to read this tract.

Addendum: Here is good background on what Dugin is up to these days.  His current motto: “Drain the swamp.”

1 anonymous February 14, 2017 at 1:09 am

“Envy tends to be the true force behind moral indignation.” Don Colacho, describing most influential intellectuals.

2 anonymous February 14, 2017 at 2:29 am

moy drook lloshche chitat’ yeshyaw ras taw shtaw oocheel choodotvtvortseeye. Vam looshche boodyet. Bawk fsyaw ooveedyit.

3 anonymous February 16, 2017 at 12:08 am

My friend, wouldn’t it be better to reread the teachings of the Orthodox wonderworkers? That would be better for you. God foresees all.

4 inertial February 14, 2017 at 1:11 am

Dugin is not nearly as important or influential as portrayed in the West.

http://www.unz.com/akarlin/dugin-putins-39th-brain/

5 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 1:56 am

Dugin is an energetic self-promoter.

It’s hard for Americans to get much of a realistic sense of what’s going on in any non-English speaking country with a language more exotic than French.

Heck, the Gessen siblings don’t seem to agree much on Russia and they’re brother and sister.

6 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 2:05 am

From the Chicago Tribune article Tyler cites on Dugin’s influence:

“Dugin, the son of a Soviet military-intelligence official, said being independent makes him an effective go-between in matters of state. The 55-year-old rabble-rouser, blacklisted by the U.S. for aiding the insurgency in Ukraine, has no official post. But he has advised a member of Putin’s inner circle and written a textbook on geopolitics that’s been used by the military.”

Dugin’s relationship to Putin sounds a lot like the recent Atlantic article about Mencius Moldbug’s relationship to Trump via Steve Bannon and Bronze Age Pervert:

From “The Atlantic:”

“Think you should speak directly to my WH cutout / cell leader,” Yarvin said in an email. “I’ve never met him and don’t know his identity, we just DM on Twitter. He’s said to be ‘very close’ to Bannon. There are several levels, but most people just start out with his public persona.” @BronzeAgePerv’s avatar is of a muscular, shirtless man and his account’s biography reads: “Steppe barbarian. Nationalist, Fascist, Nudist Bodybuilder! Purification of world. Revolt of the damned. Destruction of the cities!”

“I know nothing about BAP personally, except that he lifts. DM him. He may not give you any info but he always responds,” Yarvin said. “Apparently there’s a big underground movement of right-wing bodybuilders — thousands. Their plan is to surface spectacularly this April, in a choreographed flash demo on the Mall. They’ll be totally nude, but wearing MAGA hats. Goal is to intimidate Congress with pure masculine show of youth, energy. Trump is said to know, will coordinate with powerful EOs…”

http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-atlantic-monthly-on-bronzeagepervs-role-in-trump-administration/

7 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 2:17 am

Personally, unlike Mencius — that neoreactionary arriviste with his trendy but unsound Bronze Age new ideas — I don’t waste my time communicating with minions like Bannon.

I prefer to go right to the top.

So I issue my orders directly to President Trump through our agreed-upon go-between, new West Wing staffer Hakan Rotmwrt.

Hakan (a.k.a. Hakon) is an Ainu-American paleoreactionary dedicated to returning the planet to the time-tested verities of the New Stone Age.

Please note that he’s a moderate, not one of those Old Stone Age extremists. He’s not like the dozen OSA Brotherhood members who have secretly infiltrated Puzder’s staff (which is why you’re starting to hear so much about the need for a special sub-minimum wage for flintknappers).

8 Jan February 14, 2017 at 5:49 am

These are all good points. Also, his name is Hakkon.

9 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 12:36 pm

We must celebrate health and will to dominate. No more wheelchair ramps! Entrances must instead demand great feats of climbing and leaping.

10 msgkings February 14, 2017 at 2:18 am

Jesus that dude sounds as nuts as a person can sound, and still be vaguely coherent. Very vaguely.

11 Thor February 14, 2017 at 3:18 am

I can nap … but not flintknap.

12 A Black Man February 14, 2017 at 9:04 am

You are easily trolled.

13 Turkey Vulture February 14, 2017 at 8:39 am

The nude body building part establishes that Bronze Age Perv is someone from autoadmit.com trolling/flaming.

14 yann February 14, 2017 at 4:21 pm

this Auto Admit you speak of seems to be a law school discussion board. For nude bodybuilding, I think the blog of record is ifnb.blogspot.com

15 Turkey Vulture February 14, 2017 at 7:17 pm

I apologize Yann. I stopped lurking as the election grew closer and killed some of the board’s humor. But I think we can be united in song: “Gimme the Beef Boy and free my soul…”

16 Peter Akuleyev February 14, 2017 at 3:33 am

Dugin is useful to the regime to keep a certain faction of Eurasian nationalists in line, but I doubt Putin or anyone in the elite FSB circles takes any of Dugin’s ramblings very seriously.

17 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 1:46 am

I read up on Dugin three years ago. I wasn’t all that impressed:

http://takimag.com/article/conservatism_in_russia_and_america_steve_sailer/print#axzz4YbUP5Nvo

18 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 1:51 am

I summed up by reaction to Russian reaction as: “By geography, history, and culture, America is a more privileged place than Russia, and thus American conservatives have more and better privileges to conserve than the poor Russians do.”

19 Ibbas Passi February 14, 2017 at 1:33 pm

+1

“Eurasianism” is like “Europeanism,” an identity created to fit a political goal. Fact is, the Turkic/Persian Muslim inhabitants of central Asia have nothing in common with HuWhite, historically Christian Russia. Like the Eastern Europeans, the Central Asians will happily take money from richer Russia, but once the money runs dry, it will return to its own identity.

20 Arun Ezhutachan February 14, 2017 at 1:54 am

I was really impressed by the intellectual quality of the Russian academics coming West in the Nineties. I guess all the good ones left and its people like Dudin who remained.
Kudos to Tyler Cowan for taking the trouble to wade through this.
The big question is of course whether Turkic people and Slavic people can get along. Iran’s trajectory- lots of Azeris in the ascendant- shows Turanian and ‘Aryan’ get along great.
The older Russian speaking intelligentsia of Kazakhastan etc also have polarised towards Moscow on the basis of a common culture and the prospects of Pan Turanianism with Islamic features no longer looks quite as promising as it once did. So, at this moment, the thing looks plausible- more especially as Russian demographics looks anaemic.
There are standouts though. Kurds and Pashtuns won’t play nice with Turanians though in the ‘Aryan’ camp. The Caucuses, of course, will remain riven with complex feuds. Still, ‘Eurasia’ may be stable enough for China to dominate.

21 msgkings February 14, 2017 at 2:22 am

OK this dude is actually tied with that dude above for the king of cray.

22 So Much For Subtlety February 14, 2017 at 4:07 am

The integration of the post-Soviet surrounding territories is to occur on a democratic and voluntary basis (p.51). The nation-state is obsolete, so this is imperative as a means of protecting ethnicities and a multi-polar world against the logic of globalization. Nonetheless Russia is to be the leader of this process.

So the nation-state is obsolete so the way to protect smaller ethnic groups is to submerge them in a Greater Russia? Does he consider how this might happen on a voluntary and democratic basis? Because Russia does not have a good track record of persuading the Turkic or Baltic people to join up. What is worse is why is Russian rule over minorities any better or worse than American music dominating their radio waves?

9. The Eurasian economy must be subjugated to “higher civilizational spiritual values.” City-dwellers are often a problem, as they too frequently side with the forces of globalization.

City dwellers? That wouldn’t be a euphemism would it? You know, those rootless cosmopolitans have always been such a problem for Russia’s governments.

23 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 5:21 am

Russia didn’t get to be the largest land area country in the world by worrying about logical consistency every time it had a chance to conquer more territory.

24 A Black Man February 14, 2017 at 9:08 am

In a wide open land without a lot of tough natural barriers, you either conquer all of it or none of it. That’s a lesson Darius learned when chasing the Scythians across the steppe.

25 steveslr February 14, 2017 at 9:56 pm

Indeed.

26 inertial February 14, 2017 at 2:17 pm

There is no contradiction here. In the Eurasianist vision Russia is not very Russian. It’s, umm, a proposition nation.

27 inertial February 14, 2017 at 11:54 am

So the nation-state is obsolete so the way to protect smaller ethnic groups is to submerge them in a Greater Russia? You obviously don’t understand what Eurasianism is. Incidentally, Eurasianism is not very popular among true Russian nationalists.

Does he consider how this might happen on a voluntary and democratic basis? Of course it might. In fact, this is the likely outcome in the long term. The European dream is fading as we speak. However, it’s not clear if there will be desire on the part of Russia to bother with this stuff again.

Because Russia does not have a good track record of persuading the Turkic or Baltic people to join up. Russia has an excellent record of persuading Turkic peoples to join up, going back to Chorni Klobuky and the Qasim Khanate. As for the Baltics, they ended up in Russia as the result of a war between Russia and Sweden over lands owned by Germans. The German owners supported Russia enthusiastically and who cared what some serfs thought. Later on though, Russia supported Baltic national expressions, so the early Baltic nationalist were fervently pro-Russian. For example, see Andrejs Pumpurs, the author of Latvian national epic Lāčplēsis.

28 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 4:19 am

Moldova is not archaic, it is thelast outpost of civilization among Slav Barbarism and it will be made whole again.

29 Serghei Zagaiciuc February 14, 2017 at 4:23 am

Being the citizen and resident of Moldova, it’s nice to hear. Though we would need to fight both Ukraine and Romania at the same time for our country to make whole again. Seems like mission impossible, unless Brazil sends us some help.

30 Brasileiro February 14, 2017 at 5:45 am

We send some football players!

31 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 7:47 am

Soon or later, all Latin and African countries will join under Brazilian leadership, as taught by Prophet Bandarra and, according to a new interpretation of the teachings of French philosopher Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte. The Slav invader will be expelled from the Moldavian territory and the relarionships between Romania and Moldova will be brought to order.

32 Horhe February 14, 2017 at 3:52 pm

I take back everything I muttered under my breath about you, Thiago!

33 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 6:03 pm

Thank you!

34 Tenhofaca February 14, 2017 at 9:28 am

Do you have a decent beach? We’re not coming unless you have a beach.

35 Rich Berger February 14, 2017 at 9:39 am

You can’t be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer. -Frank Zappa

36 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 10:06 am

In fact, Brazil is the key player in the beer market. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorge_Paulo_Lemann#Career

I am against selling alcohol, but I admit he has made lots of money.

And Brazil has several of the best airlines, which is not surpirsing if one remembers who invented the airplane.

37 Horhe February 14, 2017 at 3:21 pm

By making it whole, I hope you mean reuniting it with the Romanian motherland so that the medieval principalities can rest together again.

38 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 6:06 pm

No, I mean retaking Transnistria and other lost territories. Both Romania and Moldova may form a loose Confederarion under Brazilian leadership and noth would be reunited with Brazil and the other Latin countries. A Moldovan-Romanian Confederation probably would be subjected to a referendum.

39 Horhe February 15, 2017 at 8:03 pm

Brazilian suzerainty is negotiable but a unitary Romanian-Moldovan state is not. You can keep Transnistria, but Southern Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina would be a nice additions, also making for more defensible borders. With Greater Romania thus restored, all will be right in the world under the Pax Brasiliana.

40 Jimmy February 14, 2017 at 4:49 am

“Eurasian philosophy ultimately can contain, in a Hegelian way, anti-global philosophies, as well as the contributions of Foucault, Deleuze, and Debord, not to mention List, Gesell, and Keynes properly understood.”

Funny that you should mention Keynes. Although Keynesians like Paul Krugman and Brad DeLong seem very alarmed with Donald Trump and his alleged links to Russia, some heterodox Keynesian **leftists** appear rather sympathetic to him:

http://socialdemocracy21stcentury.blogspot.com/2017/01/i-know-keynesian-when-i-hear-one.html

41 chuck martel February 14, 2017 at 6:26 am

Anything with Hegelian as a modifier is being defined as nonsense.

42 Sam The Sham February 14, 2017 at 8:15 am

Yeah, that was a quick tell that Dugin is probably a hack.

43 Jimmy February 14, 2017 at 1:11 pm

“Yeah, that was a quick tell that Dugin is probably a hack.” Well, it is beyond doubt that there’s some hackery involved, but I’m not clear at all it has to be Dugin **alone**.

So, who is the hack? Is it Dugin, for managing to put Foucault, Deleuze, Debord, List, Gesell, and Keynes together? Is it in those authors? Is it in Krugman and Delong, or is it in the heterodox Keynesians?

44 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 10:08 am

So won’t you buy the Hegelian coffee I intend to grow?

45 Sam the Sham February 14, 2017 at 10:13 am

I consume good coffee and good ideas. Coffee isn’t ideas, although there may be a platonic ideal of coffee.

46 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 12:30 pm

Yet, coffee is the raw material ideas are made of. “A mathematician is a device for turning coffee into theorems”. And Brazil sells the best coffee in the world since the early 1850s. Brazil also used to dominatemthe rubber trade.

47 Jan February 14, 2017 at 5:48 am

Dugin is an ineffectual nut. He said the assassination of the Russia’s ambassador to Turkey was a U.S. plot.

48 derek February 14, 2017 at 9:57 am

Indeed. So is Trump. And Farage.

The ineffectual nut in the US dismantled the two prominent political families, humiliated the cognoscenti of both political parties and probably will through the court appointments establish the way the country is run for a generation.

Farage, a moderately intoxicated crank, blew open the doors to the dissolution of the European Union.

Turkey has changed from a nominal if troublesome ally of the West looking for inclusion into the EU to an ally of Russia doing it’s bidding all the while actively uprooting western traditions within it’s borders. Some ineffectual nut.

This guy’s playing on the long festering Ukrainian tensions has challenged Nato itself. But for a bit of sloppiness in personal communications, US servicemen could be dying on the Steppes of the Ukraine as we speak with Hillary as President.

What is amazing about what we are seeing isn’t the strength of the opponents of the western consensus. This guy is amusing, even laughable. All the vaunted depth of thought and understanding and military prowess and economic strength seems to only result in haughty sneers then a series of Ceausescu moments.

Back in October I shared this video with a bunch of people. I suggested that will be the best description of the coming events.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWIbCtz_Xwk

49 AJ February 14, 2017 at 6:12 am

This is like a 6/10 for trolling abuse. You need more practice on blogs bro. May I also suggest following college football to increase your rage.

50 anon February 14, 2017 at 6:17 am

It amazes me that people like Dugin, and maybe Bannon, can distance themselves so far from what is a normal life. No concentration on kids and family for them. No practicing for a middle aged marathon. It is a need for cataclysm.

Obviously that is personal madness, but very sadly, we are talking about this because we worry how susceptible the world is to that madness.

Consider for a moment if Elon Musk and Steve Bannon flipped places in Trump’s universe. Why do we get the cataclysmist and not the tech utopian?

51 Jan February 14, 2017 at 7:02 am

Revealed preferences, racism edition.

52 anon February 14, 2017 at 7:12 am

Racism lived underground, but that doesn’t explain why pessimism triumphed. “Things are the worst, and only I can take you through hell to paradise.”

Maybe it is as simple was a Great Recession hangover. This turn towards catacylsm is not as great as after the Great Depression, but the same in kind.

53 Jan February 14, 2017 at 7:37 am

I just mean Trump’s preferences re staff.

Not sure it is true pessimism as much as it is resentment. Of course there’s lots of overlap.

54 anon February 14, 2017 at 7:56 am

The guy who lived in the gold apartment won the resentment vote. Some disconnects there.

55 Jan February 14, 2017 at 8:16 am

I think they were paying attention to what he was saying about all the stuff people had to resent, rather than focusing on his shiny apartment.

56 anon February 14, 2017 at 8:26 am

No, no, no. (to quote Hans Rosling) Trump did not actually talk about the stuff they had to resent, he went off in every tangent, and generalized falsely to a nation in ruin.

(Talk about The Wall and not the robots that take your jobs, because The Wall is a distraction, one that gets you nice and angry.)

Related, on truths and wilful ignorance.

http://www.sydsvenskan.se/2017-02-13/this-is-how-we-let-hans-rosling-rest-in-peace

57 anon February 14, 2017 at 8:30 am

Trump really did say to the rural poor “blame the Mexicans, not me in my golden apartment.”

58 Jan February 14, 2017 at 9:02 am
59 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:09 am

Simple question 1, what took more manufacturing jobs, automation or illegal immigration?

Simple question 2, would Hillary’s jobs plan make more rural jobs than a Wall with Mexico?

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/briefing/factsheets/2016/08/01/hillary-clintons-100-day-jobs-plan/

60 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:13 am

Basically, while Trump appealed to resentment, let’s throw away this idea that he was talking about the real problems. He succeeded by tapping resentment in an emotional way. And because he was disconnected from the actual problems, he is disconnected from the actual solutions.

61 robert February 14, 2017 at 8:46 am

Some people just want to see the world burn…

62 A Black Man February 14, 2017 at 9:10 am

The irony here is quite stunning. You are by any reasonable definition a nutjob living in a bubble. You ranting about Bannon and Dugin as insular crazies is like watching a lunatic bang on his cell bars, claiming the jailers are the one in prison.

63 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:15 am

That’s funny. You prefer the world burners to the middle aged runners. You think the runners are the sick ones.

You like Bannon over Musk.

64 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:21 am

Also, funny thing to say as news breaks my way.

https://twitter.com/ericgarland/status/831496129426706432

65 Turkey Vulture February 14, 2017 at 9:36 am

“as news breaks my way.”

You’re a crank obsessively posting about Trump on someone else’s blog. Your life is so lacking in value that you need to identify with being anti-Trump as a source of meaning, and claim any anti-Trump victories as your own. You want to watch the world burn under Trump because you imagine it will vindicate your obsession. Nothing breaks your way.

66 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:41 am

I only talk about Trump on Trump topics, which this is, because of the well known Dugin-Bannon connection.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-dugin-trump-putin-turkey-20170203-story.html

And no, I am doing my darndest to put out the fire. No thanks to those who cough amidst all the smoke and say “what fire?”

67 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:44 am

Reality:

The foreword to one of [Dugins] books was written by a retired U.S. professor, Paul Gottfried, a Trump supporter who was among the first political philosophers to use the term “alternative right” to describe the radical conservative movement. In July 2016, a month before he joined the Trump campaign, Bannon described Breitbart as “the platform for the alt-right.”

68 A Black Man February 14, 2017 at 9:49 am

True believers like anon used to have a place to channel their nuttiness. They could go into the church or become a missionary. It was a harmless way to get them out of circulation. The Saudis send their more unhinged people off to join the Taliban or ISIS for the same reason.

69 anon February 14, 2017 at 9:53 am

Yeah, the guy that drops links to his sources in every discussion is the one disconnected.

Not the people with no links, and only their own dull insistence.

Maybe you should read the Rosling link above, on ”an actively upheld ignorance”.

70 Opie February 14, 2017 at 10:35 am

Preach Brotha anon! A reward is waiting for you in heaven. God bless!

71 Thiago Ribeiro February 14, 2017 at 6:07 pm

“It was a harmless way to get them out of circulation.”

Not for the natives, although sometimes they got good meat.

72 chuck martel February 14, 2017 at 6:29 am

“We are on the side of Stalin and the Soviet Union”. He calls himself a conservative and says, “We, conservatives, want a strong, solid State, want order and healthy family, positive values, the reinforcing of the importance of religion and the Church in society”. He adds, “We want patriotic radio, TV, patriotic experts, patriotic clubs. We want the media that expresses national interests”.

The use of the first person plural indicates that at least one other maniacal statist agrees with this bozo.

73 rayward February 14, 2017 at 7:30 am

Why would Donald Trump be drawn to this world-view, the Dugin-Bannon world view? A couple of possibilities: Trump is an ignoramus and can’t understand this world-view; Trump is a narcissist with hubris and has visions of world domination; or Trump is so indebted to the Russian oligarchs that he has no choice but to succumb to their will. Consider Trump’s top appointees: they include members of the foreign policy establishment who have been itching for war with Iran; they include Wall Street billionaire bankers whose wealth is directly attributable to the liberal world order; they include a jurist who is the personification of the conservative establishment. How could Trump promote a Russian-Iranian axis while his administration foments war with Iran; how could Trump promote an end of the liberal world order while his administration promotes globalization and trade; how could Trump promote authoritarianism while his court appointees defend and promote Jeffersonianism. David Brooks: “The third possibility is that the primary threat in the Trump era is a combination of incompetence and anarchy. It could be that Trump is a chaotic clown incapable of conducting coherent policy. It could be that his staff members are a bunch of inexperienced second-raters.
Already the White House is back stabbing and dysfunctional. The National Security Council is in turmoil. Mussolini supposedly made the trains run on time, but this group couldn’t manage fascism in a phone booth.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/14/opinion/how-should-one-resist-the-trump-administration.html?ref=opinion

74 dearieme February 14, 2017 at 7:35 am

“13. Dugin enjoys writing with bullet points.” Then he is fundamentally unsound.

75 Primadant February 14, 2017 at 8:02 am

The french counterpart of Dugin is Alain Soral, who has written the preface to Dugin’s Fourth Political Theory. Although completely unknown outside of France, his book Comprendre l’Empire has currently three times more reviews on amazon.fr than Piketty’s Capital.

Once a communist he joined the Front National in the mid-2000’s and was close to Marine Le Pen for a time. He was instrumental in the shift of the FN from the old reaganian economic program of Jean-Marie Le Pen to the more left-leaning orientation of Marine Le Pen centered around the denunciation of global plutocrats and big banks and the defense of big government.

He is a raging anti-semite and conspiracy theorist and I’d say he is a mix between Alex Jones and Alexander Dugin. He wants an alliance between french born muslims and white french against the jews and he has found his biggest audience in the banlieues where antisemitism is rampant.

76 Joël February 14, 2017 at 11:02 am

That’s quite an accurate summary of Alain Soral. But I fail to see his ideological closeness with Dugin (which I confess I know only by Tyler’s today post). Does antisemitism play an importance place in Dugin’s views, for instance?

As it has already been argued here, “denunciation of plutocrats and banks” alone is too widely shared to be an argument for a close ideological connection, or there would be a close connection Soral-Hollande-Sanders-Chomsky-Putin-Trump-Le Pen-Krugman-Roosevelt.

77 Affe February 14, 2017 at 8:56 am

Sounds like neo-pan-Slavism gussied up for a new century.

It’s a bit odd to hear that “[c]ity-dwellers are often a problem” while going on about “civilization”.

78 Boy, do Russians love abstractions! February 14, 2017 at 9:18 am

The task of every mind is to comprehend reality accurately. But in Russia we are mostly interested in words and have little concern for reality. – Ivan Pavlov

Google “Courchevel + Russians + Varlamov” to see that deeply spiritual Russian disdain for Western materialistic values in all it’s glory.

79 Tom Warner February 14, 2017 at 9:32 am

Re: “The integration of the post-Soviet surrounding territories is to occur on a democratic and voluntary basis”, you need to understand this in a context in which he has also written on his FB page that Ukrainians are a mongrel race that calls out for its own genocide.

Re: his influence I don’t think really much. He’s entirely dependent on his Kremlin bankroll and would fall quickly into obscurity in a level market place of ideas.

If this is your first crack at Eurasianism his ideas might be striking, but most of what you’ve cited here is a centuries-old tradition in Russia. Outside Russia Eurasianism is influential mainly in the field of history, through its alliance with Aryan racism and the hypothesis of a militant bronze age expansion of Indo-Europeans from the steppe.

80 Archibald Meatpants February 14, 2017 at 9:34 am

Charles Clover in “Black Wind, White Snow” gives an excellent history of Eurasianism. I think Tyler previously recommended the book.

81 Joël February 14, 2017 at 11:06 am

To those commenters who dismiss or diminish the influence of Dugin (perhaps rightly): so who are the most influential Russian current political thinkers?

82 It's a guy named Political Expediency February 14, 2017 at 11:47 am

He’s been the most influential since August 1991.

In the word of Sean Guillory (author of russophilic noBSrussia blog):

Putin doesn’t seriously believe in anything beyond political survival. He knows that when he’s out of power, truly out of control, he’ll most likely be thrown to the dogs. If he’s lucky, there’ll be a sort of palace coup where he’s forced into early retirement, preferably with some kind of legal immunity. More likely he’ll be delivered up as a scapegoat and charged with all sorts of crimes real and imagined (when the archives are in someone else’s control, not much will need to be imagined). Worst case scenario for Putin- political upheaval and revolution. Either he makes it to the airport and there’s a friendly country willing to grant him asylum, or he ends up like Gaddafi. In short, a man in Putin’s position simply cannot afford to seriously harbor fantasies about Russia’s “destiny.” Sure, he can daydream or use ideology as a method of rationalizing his actions to himself and close confidants, but Putin is no ideologically-driven fanatic. His cronies even less so.

The absolute worst thing any Russia watcher can do is believe that Putin takes ideology seriously. Ideology in Russian politics is just about manipulating various groups of people. Putin can be spun as a nationalist, a revolutionary, even a liberal reformer- all that matter is you either support him or at least don’t oppose him. Your own political motivations are irrelevant.

83 TvK February 14, 2017 at 3:04 pm

I’m surprised that the discussion about Dugin on Crooked Timber hasn’t been mentioned.

Especially because it had such a remarkable discussion with a very remarkable ending.

Indeed, utterly remarkable.

http://crookedtimber.org/2015/03/10/who-is-aleksandr-dugin/

84 Art Deco February 14, 2017 at 4:14 pm

He sounds like a graphomaniac who lives entirely in his own imagination.

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